Burning Fat With Supersets

 

by Charles Poliquin Iron Magazine

 

One advantage of using supersets is that you get a lot more work done in a shorter period of time. The greater work volume amps up the fat-burning effects of a workout. Unfortunately, many workouts using supersets are not designed most efficiently to melt the pounds away. Let’s take a closer look.

 

The first problem is that superset workouts often have you perform the hardest exercises first, then the easier ones. Here is an example: 1) back squat, 2) hex bar deadlift, 3) DB alternating lunge, 4) reverse hyper. After you throw in a few upper body pushing and pulling exercises, such a workout might look like this:

 

A1. Back Squat

A2. Lat Pulldown

B1. Hex Bar Deadlift

B2. DB Military Press

C1. DB Alternating Lunge

C2. Seated Cable Row

D1. Reverse Hyper

D2. 45-Degree DB Incline Press

 

These exercises are all good choices because they are multijoint movements that create a large metabolic demand. However, performing the exercises in this order will create physical and mental challenges that are entirely avoidable.

 

One problem is that the first superset (which contains the back squat) creates so much lactate at the start of the workout that it is difficult to put maximal effort into the other effective fat-burning exercises. Another problem is that after several hard sets of squats, especially for higher reps, it’s difficult to push yourself on the demanding hex bar deadlifts. What’s the solution? Get a second wind – and rest not only physically but also mentally – by interjecting an easier superset between the squat and deadlift supersets. The following is a better way to organize a synergistic, fat-burning workout:

 

A1. Back Squat

A2. Lat Pulldown

B1. DB Alternating Lunge

B2. DB Military Press

C1. Hex Bar Deadlift

C2. Seated Cable Row

D1. Reverse Hyper

D2. 45-Degree DB Incline Press

 

Get the idea? Of the four lower body exercises, the lunge and the reverse hyper are easier than the squat and the hex bar deadlift. Backing off the intensity by doing one of these easier supersets at this point enables you to physically and mentally recover more completely so you can put more effort into the hex bar deadlift.

 

Now let’s take the program design process a step further and add the other loading parameters, as follows:

 

A1. Back Squat, 3 x 10-12, 4010, rest 30 seconds

A2. Lat Pulldown, 3 x 12-15, 3010, rest 90 seconds

B1. DB Alternating Lunge, 3 x 10-12, 4010, rest 30 seconds

B2. DB Military Press, 3 x 12-15, 3010, rest 90 seconds

C1. Hex Bar Deadlift, 3 x 10-12, 4010, rest 30 seconds

C2. Seated Cable Row, 3 x 12-15, 3010, rest 90 seconds

D1. Reverse Hyper, 3 x 15-20, 2010, rest 30 seconds

D2. 45-Degree DB Incline Press, 3 x 12-15, 3010, rest 90 seconds

 

Note that after each set of upper body exercises, you get 90 seconds of rest (as opposed to 30) before performing another lower body exercise. This extra rest allows you to be better rested before doing the more result-producing lower body exercises. Also, although the repetitions for the lower body exercises are higher than for the upper body exercises, the time it takes to complete a set is about the same because it usually takes longer to complete the lower body exercises (the exception being the reverse hyper, which has a relatively short range of motion compared to the other three exercises).

 

The bottom line is that to get the maximum fat-burning results from a workout, you need to pay close attention to exercise order. It’s a smart tip that can help you achieve the results you want, faster.

 

Source: http://www.ironmagazine.com/2014/mel…stic-approach/

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